fiery is using an event-based model to allow you to program the logic. During the life cycle of an app a range of different events will be triggered and it is possible to add event handlers to these using the on() method. An event handler is simply a function that will get called every time an event is fired. Apart from the predefined life cycle events it is also possible to trigger custom events using the trigger() method. Manual triggering of life cycle events is not allowed.

Life cycle Events

Following is a list of all life cycle events. These cannot be triggered manually, but is fired as part of the normal lifetime of a fiery server:

  • start: Will trigger once when the app is started but before it is running. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument as well as any argument passed on from the ignite() method. Any return value is discarded.
  • resume: Will trigger once after the start event if the app has been started using the reignite() method. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument as well as any argument passed on from the reignite() method. Any return value is discarded.
  • end: Will trigger once after the app is stopped. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument. Any return value is discarded.
  • cycle-start: Will trigger in the beginning of each loop, before the request queue is flushed. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument. Any return value is discarded.
  • cycle-end: Will trigger in the end of each loop, after the request queue is flushed and all delayed, timed, and asynchronous calls have been executed. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument. Any return value is discarded.
  • header: Will trigger every time the header of a request is received. The return value of the last called handler is used to determine if further processing of the request will be done. If the return value is TRUE the request will continue on to normal processing. If the return value is FALSE the response will be send back and the connection will be closed without retrieving the payload. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument and the request object as the request argument.
  • before-request: Will trigger prior to handling of a request (that is, every time a request is received unless it is short-circuited by the header handlers). The return values of the handlers will be passed on to the request handlers and can thus be used to inject data into the request handlers (e.g. session specific data). The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument and the request object as the request argument.
  • request: Will trigger after the before-request event. This is where the main request handling is done. The return value of the last handler is send back to the client as response. If no handler is registered a 404 error is returned automatically. If the return value is not a valid response, a 500 server error is returned instead. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument, the request object as the request argument, and the list of values created by the before-event handlers as the arg_list argument.
  • after-request: Will trigger after the request event. This can be used to inspect the response (but not modify it) before it is send to the client. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument, the request object as the request argument, and the response as the response argument. Any return value is discarded.
  • before-message: This event is triggered when a websocket message is received. As with the before-request event the return values of the handlers are passed on to the message handlers. Specifically if a 'binary' and 'message' value is returned they will override the original values in the message and after-message handler arguments. This can e.g. be used to decode the message once before passing it through the message handlers. The before-message handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument, a flag indicating whether the message is binary as the binary argument, the message itself as the message argument, and the request object used to establish the connection with the client as the request argument.
  • message: This event is triggered after the before-message event and is used for the primary websocket message handling. As with the request event, the handlers for the message event receives the return values from the before-message handlers which can be used to e.g. inject session specific data. The message handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument, a flag indicating whether the message is binary as the binary argument, the message itself as the message argument, the request object used to establish the connection with the client as the request argument, and the values returned by the before-message handlers as the arg_list argument. Contrary to the request event the return values of the handlers are ignored as websocket communication is bidirectional.
  • after-message: This event is triggered after the message event. It is provided more as an equivalent to the after-request event than out of necessity as there is no final response to inspect and handler can thus just as well be attached to the message event. For clear division of server logic, message specific handlers should be attached to the message event, whereas general handlers should, if possible, be attached to the after-message event. The after-message handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument, a flag indicating whether the message is binary as the binary argument, the message itself as the message argument, and the request object used to establish the connection with the client as the request argument.
  • send: This event is triggered after a websocket message is send to a client. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument and the send message as the message argument. Any return value is discarded.
  • websocket-closed: This event will be triggered every time a websocket connection is closed. The handlers will receive the app itself as the server argument, the client id as the id argument and request used to establish the closed connection as the request argument. Any return value is discarded.

Custom Events

Apart from the predefined events, it is also possible to trigger and listen to custom events. The syntax is as follows:

Additional parameters passed on to the trigger() method will be passed on to the handler. There is no limit to the number of handlers that can be attached to custom events. When an event is triggered they will simply be called in the order they have been added. Triggering a non-existing event is not an error, so plugins are free to fire off events without worrying about whether handlers have been added.

Triggering Events Externally:

If a fiery server is running in blocking mode it is not possible to communicate with it using the trigger() method (though these can be fired by other callbacks in the server logic). Instead it is possible to assign a directory to look in for event trigger instructions. The trigger directory is set using the trigger_dir field, e.g.:

Events are triggered by placing an rds file named after the event in the trigger directory. The file must contain a list, and the elements of the list will be passed on as arguments to the event handlers. After the event has been triggered the file will be deleted. The following command will trigger the external-event on a server looking in '/some/path/to/dir/':

saveRDS(list(arg1 = 'test'), '/some/path/to/dir/external-event.rds')